Tunesisch für leicht Fortgeschrittene


KursleiterIn Karina Moebius
Voraussetzungen Grundkenntnisse Tunesisch häkeln (Grundmuster)
Wir brauchen „Normale“ Häkelnadel in Stärke 2,5 oder 3 Baumwolle in passender Stärke, mehrere Farben (Wollreste) Motivation die Herausforderung anzunehmen

Kursdauer 3 Stunden
Wenn Sie das tunesische Grundmuster einigermaßen beherrschen, dann sind Sie hier richtig. Aufbauend auf das Grundmuster erlernen Sie einfaches Entrelac, also Flechtmuster, und Entrelac in Runden. Damit haben Sie das Handwerkszeug, um farbenfrohe Kissen, Decken, Taschen oder sonstige Dekoration selbst zu gestalten.


Marlisling the Kraai Mitts

KursleiterIn Anna Maltz

3-hour class

Marlisle (combining marl and colourwork, aka fairisle) is an unusual technique for creating decorative texture and colour shifts with a particular focus on seamless knitting in the round. Marlisle allows patches of stranded colourwork to be scattered around a project without the use of intarsia while avoiding unworkably long floats. It can be used to combine different weights of yarn, throw new light on your stash, overcome frustrations like jogging stripes and can even be used to adapt existing patterns. It’s a fun way to change how you look at knitting.
As an entry point into understanding this novel approach, you’ll cast on a Kraai Mitt, from Marlisle: A New Direction in Knitting, under Anna’s expert guidance. A speedy, engrossing little project inspired by old fashioned leather driving gloves with arrows on the fronts that echo birds in flight or road markings. Knitted in the round, it uses increases and decreases to create travelling stitches that mean there’s an interesting shaped chart to follow. Suitable for a range of skill levels, but perhaps most exciting for knitters who have experimented with stranded colourwork and intarsia and understand the limitations of these existing techniques.

Minimum skill level: Intermediate/advanced beginner

Class Size: Maximum 12

Existing knowledge required: Must have experience of colourwork and be confident knitting in the round.

Skills covered:

  • an insight into the possibilities of Marlisle
  • following a Marlisle stitch pattern from a chart
  • transitioning between colours for Marlisle
  • long-tail cast-on - travelling sts
  • a variety of increases and decreases
  • neat buttonhole construction

Students to bring:

  • copy of Marlisle: A New Direction in Knitting by Anna Maltz
  • 4ply/fingering yarn in 2 contrasting, but harmonious colours. At least 50gr of each. Go for 100% wool, ideally not super wash treated – you want something a little ‘sticky’.
  • 3.25mm DPNs or circular needles long enough for magic loop (depending on personal preference and existing knowledge – aka it’s not a good time to try magic-loop for the first time!) or whatever needle size needed to achieve the correct gauge).

Students can bring a range of sizes from 2.5mm to 4.5mm, as they may wish to adjust during class, while we are together.

  • pencil (at least 2 colours), scissors, ruler or tape measure

Homework: Work out which needle size works for you to get: 22 stitches x 40 rows = 10cm x 10cm/4”x 4” over garter stitch using both yarns held together after blocking. This should be a fairly DENSE garter stitch using your chosen two 4ply yarns held together.


Introduction to Marlisle

Anna Maltz
3-hour class

Marlisle (combining marl and colourwork, aka fairisle) is an unusual technique for creating decorative texture and colour shifts with a particular focus on seamless knitting in the round. Marlisle allows patches of stranded colourwork to be scattered around a project without the use of intarsia while avoiding unworkably long floats. It can be used to combine different weights of yarn, throw new light on your stash, overcome frustrations like jogging stripes and can even be used to adapt existing patterns. It’s a fun way to change how you look at knitting.

As an entry point into understanding this novel approach, you’ll create a circular swatch from a choice of designs provided (we might even get round to a sneaky bit of steeking). Suitable for a range of skill levels, but perhaps most exciting for knitters who have experimented with stranded colourwork and intarsia and understand the limitations of these existing techniques. The aim is to send you off inspired.

Minimum skill level: Intermediate/advanced beginner
Class Size: Maximum 12

Existing knowledge required: Must have experience of colourwork and be confident knitting in the round.

Skills covered:

  • following a Marlisle stitch pattern from a chart
  • working a swatch in the round, including basic knotted steek
  • combining colours
  • deducing tension

Students to bring:

  • pencil (at least 2 colours), scissors, ruler or tape measure
  • 4ply/fingering yarn in 2 contrasting, but harmonious colours. At least 25gr of each. Go for 100% wool, ideally not super wash treated – you want something a little ‘sticky’.
  • 3.25mm DPNs or circular needles long enough for magic loop (depending on personal preference and existing knowledge). Students can bring a range of sizes from 2.5mm to 4.5mm, if they wish to adjust for their personal tension on the fly. 
  • Note: You can bring DK/light worsted yarn instead (or in addition) and corresponding needle sizes.


Homework: Work out which needle size works for you to get a DENSE garter stitch using two 4ply yarns held together.
 

Preparing for a Top-Down Colourwork Sweater Knitting Adventure

ANNA MALTZ
3-hour class

In this class, we’ll discuss embarking on making a top-down yoked sweater to fit you – knitting without using a pattern! Knitting from the top down, with colourwork thrown in, is an adventurous way to work. There will be fun choices and tricky ones along the way (fit, colours and short-rows, to name a few) and you choose how much (or little) planning you would like to do before you pick up your needles and yarn.  It’s about the thrill of a journey where you have a looser idea of your final-destination. It is not for the feint hearted, but you don’t need to be a mathematical or knitting whizz to do it.

Whichever level of wing-it suits your approach to knitting (and likely, life), it’s useful to start with knowing a few simple equations, measurements and principals so you can think about how they relate to each other (and your dream sweater). This class is discussion-based and aims to send you off inspired with a good grounding in how to proceed with confidence (and plenty of permission to fudge). 


Minimum skill level: Intermediate/advanced

Existing knowledge required:

  • you must have experience knitting a sweater involving colourwork 
  • you must be totally comfortable knitting in the round and understand the terminology


Skills covered:

  • planning a top down knitted sweater to fit you
  • measuring for fit
  • considering ease
  • the benefit of short rows
  • managing floats
  • combining colours to build a palette
  • deducing tension


Students to bring:
For discussion purposes, students may wish to bring:

Yarn
Bring a good selection of your woollen DK or 4ply/fingering weight oddments leftover from previous projects and lonely single balls! The weight you choose depends on which weight you would like your sweater to be, but note that examples will be given for DK.

This will allow us to discuss building our palettes together from what we have and what is available around us in the yarn shop. Swapping encouraged – the colour you have lost the love for may be exactly someone else’s cup of tea. In colourwork, you never know what strange (and sometimes revolting) colours will make it sing – so bring them nasty ones. 

General

  • pencil
  • at least 4 different coloured pencils
  • tape measure
  • note paper/book
  • squared/graph/stitch related paper
  • calculator (if you don’t have a mobile phone with one on it)

If you have a favourite sweater fit-wise (bought, borrowed, handmade or not) wear it to the workshop (or simply bring it along) so you can take some measurements from it as reference. If you have a dream sweater in mind, draw it and bring your drawing along.


Knotted Steek 

Anna Maltz
3-hour class


Steeks are indispensable in allowing you to knit all manner of colourwork projects in the round, from the right side only, thereby avoiding purling with two colours on the wrong side. They are most commonly used to knit cardigans as if they were sweaters. A steek involves cutting your stitches, which seams terrifying until you do it. Steeking remains a thrilling moment, because it feels naughty to put scissors to your knits. However, when practiced correctly, your stitches will be totally safe! (It’s certainly good to do it in good company the first time.)

The knotted steek is an unusual approach that is ideal for maintaining the stretchiness of your knitted fabric in a way that many steeks do not, because they rely on the use of crochet, sewing or ribbon to secure the stitches – these have much less stretch than most knitted fabric. Though it takes some time, the knotted steek results in a very smooth and not at all bulky finish that does not need to be used along the entire edge. This allows for greater flexibility and options in where you use a steek, which creates interesting design possibilities. It can also be used to build in an attractive fringed edge to shawls and scarves knitted in the round. This is the steek Anna Maltz uses in her patterns and it appears 3 times in Marlisle: A New Direction in Knitting.

Suitable for stranded colourwork knitters of all levels who wish to expand their knowledge of steeks or those who wish to try steeking for the first time.

Minimum skill level: Intermediate/advanced beginner
Class Size: Maximum 12

Existing knowledge required: Must have experience of colourwork and be confident knitting in the round. No prior steeking experience required.

Skills covered:

  • understanding the function and application of steeks
  • casting on and off for a knotted steek
  • establishing a steek zone
  • using steek edge stitches
  • securing stitches for safety
  • cutting knits

Students to bring:

  • 4ply/fingering yarn in 2 contrasting, but harmonious colours. At least 25gr of each. Go for 100% wool, ideally not super wash treated – you want something a little ‘sticky’ for easier steeking.
  • 3mm DPNs or circular needles long enough for magic loop (depending on personal preference and existing knowledge – aka it’s not a good time to try magic-loop for the first time!) or whatever needle size needed to achieve a good colourwork gauge). Students can bring a range of sizes from 2.25mm to 4mm, as they may wish to adjust during class, while we are together. 
  • pencil, small sharp scissors


Träumen Androiden von elektrischen Schafen?


Valentina Cosciani

  • HE LITTLE GREY SHEEP British Mini Skeins – Stein Fine Wool (Fingering Garn; 100% Wolle: 67 m / 20 g pro Knäuel).
  • Erste Farbe (EF): hellgrau; 1 Knäuel
  • Zweite Farbe (ZF): neongrün; 1 Knäuel
  • Dritte Farbe (DF): violet; 1 Knäuel; Vierte Farbe (VF): gelb; 1 Knäuel
  • Fünfte Farbe (FF): dunkelgrau; 1 Knäuel
  • Rundstricknadeln: 3 mm mit 80 cm–Kabel (für die Magic Loop-Methode) oder ein Nadelspiel
  • Wollnadel und Schere
  • 1 Maschenmarkierer

Testen Sie ev. verschiedene Nadelstärken, um die Maschenprobe zu treffen. Maschenprobe: 24 Maschen und 29 Runden = 10 cm glatt rechts gestrickt (rund gestrickt und gespannt).
Natürlich kann man auch andere Wolle verwenden!


Steek

Valentina Cosciani

  • JAMIESON & SMITH 2ply Jumper Weight (Fingering Garn; 100% Shetland-Wolle: 114 m / 25 g pro Knäuel).
  • Erste Farbe (EF): grau (27); 1 Knäuel
  • Zweite Farbe (ZF): rot (93); 1 Knäuel
  • Rundstricknadeln: 3 mm mit 80 cm–Kabel (für die Magic Loop-Methode) oder ein Nadelspiel
  • Wollnadel und Schere
  • Häckeln 3
  • 1 Maschenmarkierer

 

Hier MUSS MAN UNBEDINGT Shetland Wolle verwenden... oder similar! Kein Merino, Cashmere, alpaca usw.

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